5 Geriatric Care Management Tips for the Sandwich Generation

The Sandwich Generation refers to a generation of people who are caring for their aging parents while supporting their own children. If you’re a caregiver in this generation you might liken the associated financial and emotional stress with the feeling of being “sandwiched” between the two responsibilities that are taking up most of your time.

Sandwich generation providers can create a care management sandwich that meets their needs and the needs of their aging parent(s) through effective planning, support, and advocacy.

5 crucial ingredients for a balanced care management sandwich:

  • Emotional well-being
  • Financial Planning
  • Healthcare
  • Career
  • Family

1. Emotional Well-being

For those taking on the greatest time commitment for providing care for an aging parent or parents and also trying to fulfill their own parenting obligations, finding time for self is an important part of maintaining balance in life. Caregiver burnout can seriously impact your quality of life and your ability to continue caring for your loved ones. It is essential that you carve out some time for yourself every day to do something for yourself. It might be a session at the gym, coffee with a friend, reading a book, or any activity that recharges your emotional batteries.

2. Financial Planning

Perhaps one of the biggest contributors to sandwich generation caregiver stress is managing the costs associated with raising children and maintaining the health of aging parents.

To help ease the financial burden talk to your family members and involve them in the financial planning process. Assess all of your financial resources and create separate accounts with allocated budgets for long-term care management and day-to-day expenses for the whole family. If this task seems too overwhelming, seek the help of a Certified Financial Planner that deals with long term care planning. Contact us to help find a specialist that meets your needs.

3. Healthcare

As your parents age, medical issues are likely to arise. Advance planning for possible physical and mental healthcare issues is key to effectively managing them. It is helpful for caregivers to visit and evaluate several long-term care facilities well ahead of the need for placement. Understand that institutionalization may be a normal progression in the process. Encourage the completion of a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care form or an Advance Health Directive for Dementia in the event of your aging parent(s) being unable to make healthcare decisions for themselves at a later stage. Also see: Practical Advice on Caring For a Parent with Dementia5-step Geriatric Care Management Plan for Dementia Patients and the Families Caring for Them

Part of your planning should also include ways of keeping your aging parent(s) active. Involve them, as far as possible, in the day-to-day chores in the household and plan simple mental and physical activities like reading to the children, doing a crossword, going for a walk, joining a senior activity group etc.

4. Family

Multiple generations living together in one household can be stressful. There are so many voices that need to be heard, and often not enough time for everyone to have their say. Open, honest family communication is so very important for maintaining household balance. Try and set aside a time, perhaps around the dinner table, for each family member to talk about their day or share a personal experience. Plan a monthly family outing, even it’s in the back yard with a ball. Laugh together as often as you can and learn to sweat the small stuff.

5. Career

Juggling work-life balance is an art that requires a lot of planning and support – from your family and your employers. Don’t be afraid to ask your family members and colleagues for help if you need it, and you probably will. A geriatric care manager can also help you find the care management support and resources you need.