5 Geriatric Care Management Tips for the Sandwich Generation

The Sandwich Generation refers to a generation of people who are caring for their aging parents while supporting their own children. If you’re a caregiver in this generation you might liken the associated financial and emotional stress with the feeling of being “sandwiched” between the two responsibilities that are taking up most of your time.

Sandwich generation providers can create a care management sandwich that meets their needs and the needs of their aging parent(s) through effective planning, support, and advocacy.

5 crucial ingredients for a balanced care management sandwich:

  • Emotional well-being
  • Financial Planning
  • Healthcare
  • Career
  • Family

1. Emotional Well-being

For those taking on the greatest time commitment for providing care for an aging parent or parents and also trying to fulfill their own parenting obligations, finding time for self is an important part of maintaining balance in life. Caregiver burnout can seriously impact your quality of life and your ability to continue caring for your loved ones. It is essential that you carve out some time for yourself every day to do something for yourself. It might be a session at the gym, coffee with a friend, reading a book, or any activity that recharges your emotional batteries.

2. Financial Planning

Perhaps one of the biggest contributors to sandwich generation caregiver stress is managing the costs associated with raising children and maintaining the health of aging parents.

To help ease the financial burden talk to your family members and involve them in the financial planning process. Assess all of your financial resources and create separate accounts with allocated budgets for long-term care management and day-to-day expenses for the whole family. If this task seems too overwhelming, seek the help of a Certified Financial Planner that deals with long term care planning. Contact us to help find a specialist that meets your needs.

3. Healthcare

As your parents age, medical issues are likely to arise. Advance planning for possible physical and mental healthcare issues is key to effectively managing them. It is helpful for caregivers to visit and evaluate several long-term care facilities well ahead of the need for placement. Understand that institutionalization may be a normal progression in the process. Encourage the completion of a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care form or an Advance Health Directive for Dementia in the event of your aging parent(s) being unable to make healthcare decisions for themselves at a later stage. Also see: Practical Advice on Caring For a Parent with Dementia5-step Geriatric Care Management Plan for Dementia Patients and the Families Caring for Them

Part of your planning should also include ways of keeping your aging parent(s) active. Involve them, as far as possible, in the day-to-day chores in the household and plan simple mental and physical activities like reading to the children, doing a crossword, going for a walk, joining a senior activity group etc.

4. Family

Multiple generations living together in one household can be stressful. There are so many voices that need to be heard, and often not enough time for everyone to have their say. Open, honest family communication is so very important for maintaining household balance. Try and set aside a time, perhaps around the dinner table, for each family member to talk about their day or share a personal experience. Plan a monthly family outing, even it’s in the back yard with a ball. Laugh together as often as you can and learn to sweat the small stuff.

5. Career

Juggling work-life balance is an art that requires a lot of planning and support – from your family and your employers. Don’t be afraid to ask your family members and colleagues for help if you need it, and you probably will. A geriatric care manager can also help you find the care management support and resources you need.

Identity Fraud Targeting the Elderly

The largest coordinated sweep of identity fraud involving US seniors has recently been conducted. The US Department of Justice has reported that more than one million elderly people have collectively lost hundreds of millions of dollars because of this targeted financial abuse. The Department has criminally charged 200 out of 250 defendants identified in the sweep. These third party scam artists account for 27% of seniors who are financially exploited.

Digital FraudsterCon artists and scammers employ many different schemes to defraud seniors of their identity information and money. A large number of them are conducted over the telephone, for instance posing as an Internal Revenue Service agent claiming back taxes are owed, or frightening a grandparent to think that their grandchild has been arrested and needs bail money wired to them. Other schemes include the promise of a prize or lottery cash if they just send a large fee in order to collect their “winnings.” Seniors become easy victims when targeted by these social engineering schemes and it is likely to get worse because of the proliferation of smart phones and other devices that get seniors to explore the online world.

USA Today reports that while phone scams target one senior at a time the online environment is opening doors to thousands or even millions of seniors falling prey to a single scam. Email and other online channels can reach a vast number of potential victims and more elderly people have an online presence than ever before.

Romance scams that used to be conducted in person can now be achieved in the online dating environment and even in social media. The attacker can befriend multiple seniors online and then ask for money to cover “travel expenses” to visit them. This is particularly successful as many seniors are dealing with isolation and loneliness.

The online shopping world is another vehicle employed by scam artists to defraud seniors of money. All that is needed is a picture of an object that seems to be owned by the scammer and you have the potential to sell that item over and over again to thousands of seniors. All the scam artist has to do is set up a mirror web site that appears to be a legitimate online auction house such as E-bay to drain seniors of their money as well as obtain credit card and other identity information. These mirror sites masquerading as official websites are often in the email accounts of seniors and a mere click on a link can download malicious software to their device that is designed to steal critical identity information.

Of the 27% of seniors who do become financially exploited by a third party, 67% do not exhibit symptoms of cognitive decline. That is a huge number of mentally fit seniors being financially exploited. This is a pervasive problem in the elderly community. According to the Federal Trade Commission’s “Consumer Sentinel Network Data Book 2017” identity fraud is second only to debt collection with regard to consumer complaints. Identity fraud accounted for 14% of all consumer complaints last year. The Commission also reported that seniors who are financially exploited suffer higher median losses than other age groups.

Many seniors who have been targeted are embarrassed, ashamed, or scared as a result. Many never saw themselves as being at risk, they fear retribution from the perpetrator, and they fear that government agencies or family members will label them unfit to care for themselves.

Systems can be put in place to monitor senior accounts and make their money less easy to access by scammers. In addition, there are legal documents that can protect the accounts of seniors during their lifetime, and eliminate the chance of fraud or abuse.

This blog post was written and submitted by the St. Charles Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Firm, Fitzgerald Law Office LLC

Please contact them for more information on how they can help you or your loved ones reduce the chance of financial fraud or abuse.

Food for Thought: Why Switching to Veganism Can Be an Invaluable Health Choice for Seniors With Disabilities

Advancing in age also means becoming more vulnerable to a long list of diseases and disabilities. But much like other population groups, the elderly may also enjoy the health benefits of switching to a vegan diet. The topic of aging and veganism is not widely studied but here are some of the ways that senior citizens can be assisted with a balanced diet of vegetables, fruits, grains, legumes, seeds, and nuts.

Improves mobility

The most common issue for seniors is mobility, more so for disabled ones. The latest accurate US Census data showed that two-thirds of the population reported having difficulty in walking or climbing. There are several reasons for this, such as declining bone health, because aging signals a loss of minerals and calcium in the bones.

While there is no guarantee that brittle bones will be reversed by a vegan diet, Harvard School of Public Health notes that calcium, which is important for improving bone density, is better sourced from plants instead of dairy. The latter has been associated with other illnesses that can also affect the ability of seniors to move around such as diabetes, heart conditions, and cancer. A diet rich with a variety of beans, dark leafy vegetables, grains, and fruits will help seniors reach their daily calcium requirements and might even improve their mobility.

Improves eyesight

Improves Eyesight

There are numerous age-related eye health problems that can cause the diminishing or total loss of vision in the elderly such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy. However, BBC News reported that a change in diet can reverse vision impairment that is consistent with aging. Aside from carrots, other types of food to look out for are those that contain three essential chemicals: lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin. These macular pigments can be found naturally in plants such as kiwi, bell peppers, kale, spinach, collard greens, corn, and saffron.

Improves hearing

Improves Hearing

Although little evidence can be found between the relationship of food and hearing, there are several claims that suggest a vegan diet can boost hearing among the elderly. Loss of hearing is another disability that plagues the older generation due to wear and tear of the nerve cells around the ears. Eating more potassium-rich foods such as bananas, melons, and apricots can induce cell interaction in the inner ear as well as protect damage to the cells, nerves, and blood vessels. A similar effect can be experienced with a healthy intake of vitamins C, E, and D which can be found in papaya, red bell peppers, kiwi, and broccoli as well as supplements. Additionally, flax and chia seeds, walnuts, olive and coconut oil, and beans will provide the essential omega-3 fatty acids that reduce inflammation in the ears.

Improves brain health

Improves Brain Health

Another topic that merits a deeper investigation is the relationship of food with brain-related illnesses such as Alzheimer’s and dementia, although some evidence of a positive link have been found. Health IQ cited the preliminary findings of a study that examined adults who eat meat and those who don’t. Careful observation led researchers to conclude that those who follow an omnivorous diet are twice as likely to experience the onset of dementia. Living Life With Dignity recognizes that dealing with the condition is equally difficult for the afflicted elderly and those who care for them, which is why finding ways to delay or completely prevent it is a priority.

Seniors and caregivers alike should get informed and consult with a physician before making a decision. The aforementioned benefits still depend on many factors such as the accessibility of plant-based food for the seniors or the intensity of their disability. However, it is never too late for the elderly to take charge of their life by converting to a healthier alternative when it comes to food choices.

Choose Love, Not Stuff

I wrote this while my mother was ill some time ago, but the message is still true: Choose balance, choose love, and replace “things” with treasured memories and happy days.

There is never enough time.

Find time for balance in your lifeAs I sit here in the ICU with my ailing mother I lament on what I should have done. What else could I have done? There is never enough time. We all have choices as to how we live our lives and sometimes it is difficult to know when you need to take time away from work to help someone else or when it will be ok to just carry on your day.

I am so aware of my actions and emotions these days that I often feel that ignorance is bliss. How much easier it would be to just react and not be proactive. I have to catch myself and encourage myself to live in this moment. Last night I thought my mother wasn’t going to last through Christmas she was so sick. Today is a good day. She is alert, smiling and eating. I am happy, in this moment, at this time to have her, to love her.

I am reminded of the story “I’ll Love you Forever.” It is a story of a mother that cares and nurtures her son. As a baby she rocks him and tells him she will love him forever. As the story goes on it depicts the relationship of the mother and son and how it changes until the little boy is a grown man caring for and nurturing his mother, rocking her as she had rocked him. As I am blessed to be able to care for my own mother I realize that this transition has occurred. I am now her parent.

When I was a little girl I used to love to be rocked, (truth be told, I still rock when I am stressed). Instead of asking my mother if she would rock me, I would ask her “Momma, can I rock you?” I, like the son in the story, would love nothing more than to pick her up and rock her to sleep. Sleep, with sweet, sweet dreams of heaven.

Only God knows when he will take her, but I know she is ready. She has told me so. What a blessing to know that she is satisfied with her life and that she, while frightened of the unknown like all of us, is at peace knowing she is going “HOME” soon.

Part of having a balance in life is being able to live with the choices you make. Loving and being loved go hand-in-hand.

May you always realize that time and love are your greatest gifts. May you always remember what is important in life. May you make good choices, starting with choosing happiness and love over objects and clutter.

10 Safety Tips for the Elderly during the Icy Winter Months

Winter Safety Tips for Seniors

Remember the excitement you felt as a kid when you got a snow day?!  Your imagination went wild as you fantasized about the snow fort you would make next to your perfect snow man.

Unfortunately as we age, snow days become less exciting and more of an inconvenience, and sometimes even dangerous.  Making sure your car starts, getting someone to look after the kids (who are overjoyed at staying home from school), keeping the house warm without breaking the bank, trying to get to work without getting into an accident with that jerk in the SUV who always travels way too fast in bad weather…

If you have an elderly family member that you care for, the weather causes an even bigger issue as they are at greater risk in snowy conditions and freezing temperatures. Slipping on ice, Winter depression, nutritional deficiency and even carbon monoxide poisoning are major concerns for the elderly during the icy winter months.

Here are 10 safety tips to assist your elderly loved one during the winter season:

1. Set up grocery or (better yet) pre-made meals delivery service

This will ensure that your loved one has the food they need on a regular basis and will take some of the strain off you. Make sure that they are eating a varied diet rich in Vitamin D so as to avoid a deficiency from lack of exposure to the sun. Proteins like salmon, tuna, mackerel, beef liver and egg yolks, dairy products like milk and cheese, and certain grains and cereals are all Vitamin D rich foods that can prevent any nutritional deficits.

2. Hire a service or young neighbors to shovel or snow blow your family member’s driveway and sidewalks if there’s a storm

Preventing slips and falls is crucial for the elderly in icy conditions. The older you get the more fragile your muscles and bones become, and one small slip could cause major injuries requiring extensive and painful surgery.

3. Make sure their furnace is in working order and turned on

Have a service come out to check the furnace (before there’s an issue) to make sure it’s in working order. Also check the carbon monoxide detector and replace the batteries if necessary.

4. Connect with your loved one’s neighbors

Exchange information with them so that if you’re not able to get to your elderly loved one due to weather conditions, you can contact them to check in on your loved one.

5. Ask younger neighbors if they would mind checking the mail every few days

This will enable your family member to stay inside and avoid the possibility of falling and breaking a hip on the ice.

6. Put a list of emergency numbers on their refrigerator

Include contact numbers for non-emergency police, fire, immediate relatives and neighbors.

7. Create an emergency plan

If you are unable to get to your loved one during a severe winter storm, create a plan that includes who will check in on your loved one during the storm, where they will go in case of a power outage and who will be in charge of coordinating and implementing the plan. Make sure there are working flashlights with extra batteries and warm blankets around the house in case of a power outage.

8. Encourage fluid intake

Heating a home can cause the house to become dry and cause dehydration.  Pick up some bottled water to keep in their fridge. Remind them that sugary drinks, caffeine, and alcohol act as diuretics so interchanging those fluids with water is important.

9. Encourage your elderly loved one to wear layers and avoid going outside if at all possible

If they must go outside, ensure that they wear rubber soled boots/shoes for traction, and use an adaptive device such as a 3 prong cane for support.

10. Look out for Winter Depression in your elderly loved one

The cold and isolation can lead to depression, so it’s important to make regular contact with your loved one, and ask neighbors, friends and other family members to do the same. Regularly check in on elderly relatives, friends and neighbors in person if possible. If you live far away, contact another relative, neighbor or someone from their local church/synagogue who can stop by and check on them.

Read more on Depression in the elderly here:

Written by Author and Keynote Speaker Sue Salach-Cutler. Sue has a Master’s degree in Gerontology and has worked in the healthcare field for over 25 years.  She is the Author of “Along Comes Grandpa”, a caregiving resource guide, and the novel “If I Walked in Her Shoes”. Her programs and books provide the vital resources needed to help family caregivers as they maneuver through the caregiving journey. Find out more about her books and programs here: CaregiverLife.com. Adapted from: https://theworkingcaregiver.org

Practical Advice on Caring For a Parent with Dementia

Mental Health CareWhen a diagnosis of dementia is made, the physician is pivotal in providing the knowledge and resources that are needed to care for the patient. Because family members provide the majority of care for persons with dementia, they are an essential resource for the patient and the health care system. Making sure physicians who are overseeing medical care for your loved one understand your needs as a family caregiver and the challenges you face are essential aspects of caring for the person with dementia. A physician/caregiver/patient relationship is the recommended approach for meeting the needs of both you and your loved one.

Dementia Caregiving and the Health Care System

Physicians can provide a proactive approach to support by providing you with information about dealing with your loved one’s dementia symptoms, and linking you with resources (e.g., the Alzheimer’s Association). This can improve your capabilities as a caregiver and lead to more successful and enduring caregiving.

Make sure your loved ones’ physician:

  • Works collaboratively with their other physicians, nurses and/or social workers who are knowledgeable about symptom and behavioral management strategies;
  • Understands that you are physically, emotionally, and financially vulnerable;
  • Understands that to be an effective and knowledgeable caregiver, you often rely on physicians to provide information about dementia symptom management and the availability of support services.

5 Steps Caregivers can take to Prepare for Dementia Care Problems

Dementia and the Health Care System

Because dementia is a deteriorating condition that develops over an extended period of time, care problems can be anticipated and planned for well in advance. Use these tips to get started:

  1. The physician can help family members anticipate changes, plan for role transitions, and arrange for education and support that is needed to provide care.
  2. In the earliest stages of the disease, it is helpful for caregivers to identify a health care proxy for the person with dementia. Encourage the completion of a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care form (your physician should have copies available in their office.) The copy of completed forms becomes part of patient’s record. (See What is a Health Directive for Dementia? for a downloadable dementia-specific health care form.)
  3. Caregivers need to maintain their personal health and vitality to provide continuing care for the demented patient. (see Recognizing Caregiver Burnout and Dementia and Caregiving Challenges).
  4. Caregivers should become familiar early in the illness with adult day-care services and in-home or in-facility respite services.
  5. It is helpful for caregivers to visit and evaluate several long-term care facilities well ahead of the need for placement. Understand that institutionalization may be a normal progression in the process.

Information for this blog was cited from the Alzheimer’s Association and the American Medical Association.

Written by Author and Keynote Speaker Sue Salach-Cutler. Sue has a Master’s degree in Gerontology and has worked in the healthcare field for over 25 years.  She is the Author of “Along Comes Grandpa”, a caregiving resource guide, and the novel “If I Walked in Her Shoes”. Her programs and books provide the vital resources needed to help family caregivers as they maneuver through the caregiving journey. Find out more about her books and programs here: CaregiverLife.com.  Adapted from: https://theworkingcaregiver.org